Digg users rebel against account cancellations

, posted: 2-May-2007 16:15

Matt at Idealog told me to look at Digg's front page, so I did:

Digg
(Click on picture for larger version)
That's the Diggers rebelling against account cancellations brought on by people posting the HD-DVD decryption key (09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0) that lets you play most such movies in Linux.

It seems Digg folded under studio pressure and not only deleted the stories posted, but also cancelled people's accounts.

Needless to say, the Diggers didn't take kindly to such a thing. Guess that crowd thing cuts both ways huh?

Update Kevin Rose says he hears the crowd and no more HD-DVD decryption key stories will be deleted. Die fighting is the deal now but if it comes to that, I reckon Kevin and Co will have lots of contributors to the legal fund.

Update II It's not about copyright, EFF's Fred von Lohmann writes. It's the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (now there's a misnomer) itself. Fred says:
The DMCA provides that: No person shall ... offer to the public, provide, or otherwise traffic in any technology, product, service, device, component, or part thereof that that -

(A) is primarily designed or produced for the purpose of circumventing a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title;

(B) has only limited commercially significant purpose or use other than to circumvent a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title; or

(C) is marketed by that person or another acting in concert with that person with that person's knowledge for use in circumventing a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title.

No "safe harbour" provisions, no freedom of speech; it's plain illegal to post the HD-DVD decryption key.

Update III Nicole Smith from Trylon Strategic Media Relations wrote in with a link to a good analysis piece from BusinessWeek, about the "untameable" crowds of Web 2.0.


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Other related posts:
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The problem with naming and shaming






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